• Joel

Blaspheming the Holy Spirit



Hello, saints! In case you'd like to study more closely on this topic, below are Joel's notes for his Wednesday Night's Message on Blaspheming the Holy Spirit:


Tonight, we’re going to talk about Blaspheming the Holy Spirit. I’m not covering this because anyone brought this up on a podcast, although this does periodically come up. This was just next on my list of topics to cover about the Holy Spirit. For those who watch the podcasts, you know that I have NO soapboxes at all. Hardly anything gets me fired up. But I admit I’m passionate about this subject. If you disagree and want to debate me on this on a podcast, you better bring your A game. I will fight you on every point. Do not miss a single detail tonight. And I think the best place to start is here in Matthew 6.


Matt. 6:14-15:


Mat 6:14 For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you: Mat 6:15But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

Those of us who have been in the grace movement a while are very familiar with these passages. These are passages we often cite to make a distinction between kingdom and grace, because here, for the disciples, forgiving others was a requirement to receive forgiveness from God the Father. But what does Paul tell us? He says we’ve already been forgiven! Colossians 2:13 tells us that God has “forgiven you ALL trespasses.” ALL trespasses have been forgiven. Matt. 6:15 and Col. 2:13 are not contradictions in the Bible. They are simply different programs. Whereas the disciples had to forgive in order to receive forgiveness from the Father, you are the moment you believed forgiven of all your sins. Every last one of your sins – past, present, and future – all have been forgiven. Why shouldn’t they be forgiven? Christ’s death on the cross was so all-sufficient as to pay for every sin you’ve ever done or ever will do! If Col. 2:13 isn’t enough evidence, how about Eph 4:32? And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you. Or Col 3:13 Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. Unlike the kingdom program, forgiveness today isn’t something we do in order to earn God’s forgiveness! Forgiveness of all our sins was automatic the very moment we believed. God has instantly forgave all our sins because Christ’s death on that cross was all-sufficient as an atoning work for all sin!


But back to Matt. 6. I have a number of questions about these passages.


Question 1. I’ve seen articles try to character these passages as the “sin of unforgiveness.” Is unforgiveness a sin? Think carefully. Let me answer that question with another question. How can unforgiveness be a sin if the Father chooses to NOT forgive His own disciples? If unforgiveness was a sin than the Father would be sinning by choosing to NOT forgive His disciples! If unforgiveness was a sin, then the Great White Throne judgment would be the greatest sin ever against all of humanity! Nowhere in the Bible will you read that unforgiveness is a sin. Forgiveness was a principle that the wise man embodied. Solomon said in Pro 19:11 The discretion of a man deferreth his anger; and it is his glory to pass over a transgression. So forgiveness is only a principle, not a law, that the Lord wanted to see embodied in His disciples when they went out to the lost sheep of the house of Israel to tell them the good news about the kingdom being at hand. Within the context of those circumstances of the disciples going to the people of Israel with the gospel of the kingdom, that Jesus wanted them to forgive all people of all wrong ever done to them. And there would be consequences to unforgiveness, not because it’s a sin, but because their unforgiveness would’ve become a hindrance to the spread of the gospel of the kingdom. I their unforgiveness will cause people to reject the gospel, the Lord won’t put up with that. He’s telling them that if their behavior interferes with their acceptance of the gospel, then there will be eternal consequences for that. He’s not going to put up with one of them becoming a stumblingblock to the dissemination of the gospel. So if they didn’t forgive someone, they didn’t sin, but there would be eternal consequences because their unforgiveness became a hindrance to the gospel and that will affect their eternal seat and role in the kingdom. But we’ll get back to this point.


Let me ask another question. Why is the Father mentioned here? Why do they have to worry about the Father not forgiving them? Isn’t it going to be the Lord Himself who will judge them at His Second Coming? Absolutely. But see, even when the Lord judges, we find again that it’ll be the entire Godhead operating together. The Lord will be fulfilling the will of the Father when He judges them, and those judgments will be carried out by the Holy Spirit. Everything, even judgment, is from the Father, by Jesus Christ, and through the Holy Spirit.


Another question. What does it mean for the disciples if the Father doesn’t forgive them if they don’t forgive others? As Brad would say, what does that look like? Before you can even study blaspheming the Spirit, you must have a good working knowledge of what it meant in the kingdom program for God to not forgive someone, because tonight we’re going to encounter expressions like not be forgiven, never forgiveness, and being in danger of eternal damnation. The phrase “unpardonable sin” doesn’t exist in the Bible. It’s just an expression given to describe the nature of the sin of blaspheming the Spirit. So what did it mean for the kingdom saints to NOT be forgiven of something? Turn to Rev. 2. I think we all know that when it comes to our spiritual lives and ministry we are dealing in eternal things. Acceptance of the gospel will determine the eternal destiny of your soul. The good works we do in the Lord will earn us rewards at the Bema Seat, which are eternal. We are dealing in eternal things. Whether we’re talking about the time past or this age of grace, everything every saint ever does has eternal consequences. We are all dealing in eternal things. Look at what the Lord says to one of the seven churches in


Rev 2:26 And he that overcometh, and keepeth my works unto the end, to him will I give power over the nations: Rev 2:27 And he shall rule them with a rod of iron; as the vessels of a potter shall they be broken to shivers: even as I received of my Father.

Notice here that judgment for the Jews during the Tribulation isn’t so much about how many sins they committed, which would knock down their placement in the kingdom. God’s focus is upon how well they overcame the Tribulation, how well they kept the works of the Lord whether to the end of their lives or to the end of the Tribulation, how well they obeyed all of the Lord’s instructions – THAT is what will determine their placement in the kingdom. If they consistently kept His works throughout the Tribulation, they would be rewarded with seats of enormous authority in the kingdom here on Earth. Now, of course, sin and obedience to the Lord are intertwined. The more they obey the Lord, the less they’ll sin. But the focus by God, the emphasis in these passages is that their obedience to the Lord will determine their placement in the kingdom. So what did the Lord mean when He told the disciples Mat 6:15 But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses? Does this mean that the disciples will lose their salvation? No. We’ve gone over this before, and I won’t go into detail again. But Romans 4, John 3:16, Gen. 15:6, Hab. 2:4, saints in time past were all saved by faith alone in what God told them at the time, and they all had eternal security. It was impossible for any of the disciples to lose their salvation. So does God’s non-forgiveness mean that a disciple won’t be able to enter the kingdom? No. It simply means that there will be an eternal consequence for failing to forgive. If they failed to forgive, the Father will hold that against them, which will have an eternal consequence about where they’ll be seated and what their role will entail in the kingdom. If they want that top seat sitting on the right hand of the Lord, then they had better make sure they forgave everyone regardless of the wrong done to them. They, like us, are dealing in eternal matters with eternal consequences. To not be forgiven simply meant that there would be eternal consequences in terms of their placement, their reward, and their role in the kingdom. That’s what it meant.


Blaspheming the Holy Spirit


This brings us to Matt. 12. Turn with me to Matt. 12. Now this moment in which the Lord talks about blasphemy against the Spirit is only found here in Matt. 12, Mark 3, and Luke 11. We’re only going to look at Matthew and Mark. Luke doesn’t say anything different than what we’re going to read in these other two accounts. We’ll start in vs. 22.


Mat 12:22 Then was brought unto him one possessed with a devil, blind, and dumb: and he healed him, insomuch that the blind and dumb both spake and saw. Mat 12:23 And all the people were amazed, and said, Is not this the son of David? Mat 12:24But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils. (Do you know what Beelzebub means? It means “dung god,” “the lord of filth.”) Mat 12:25 And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand:Mat 12:26 And if Satan cast out Satan, he is divided against himself; how shall then his kingdom stand? Mat 12:27 And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils, by whom do your children cast them out? therefore they shall be your judges. Mat 12:28 But if I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you.Mat 12:29 Or else how can one enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he first bind the strong man? and then he will spoil his house. Mat 12:30 He that is not with me is against me; and he that gathereth not with me scattereth abroad. Mat 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy againstthe Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. Mat 12:32 And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the worldto come.

First, I just have to say how awesome it is to see Christ and the Father take a stand for the Holy Spirit. We often talk about how the Lord lives to glorify the Father, how the Father glorifies the Son by making Him head over all things, and the Spirit glorifies the Father and the Son, and the Father and the Son glorify the work of the Spirit, by esteeming the Holy Scriptures above their own name. And yet, here, we see Christ and the Father are willing to deal with blasphemy against themselves, but they will not tolerate any blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, which goes to show how much they love and respect the Spirit. You will not speak evil of the Holy Spirit. We will not put up with it. That’s just amazing.


So the Lord heals this man who was possessed, blind, and mute. That is an astonishing miracle. We covered in past messages how Christ operated in conjunction with the Holy Spirit to accomplish miracles. Every miracle was the entire Godhead operating together as one. It was the will of the Father, by Jesus Christ, through the Holy Spirit. When the disciples carried out miracles, it was because they had the Spirit upon them. Miracles were done through the Holy Spirit. This is why the Lord went off on the Pharisees about blaspheming the Spirit when they said in Mat 12:24 that This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils. That wasn’t just an attack on the Lord but an attack on the Holy Spirit who was carrying out those miracles on the Lord’s behalf. And this is the framework to the discussion about blaspheming the Holy Spirit. This is what it means to blaspheme the Spirit.


For the sake of reference, Webster’s 1828, defines “blasphemy” as 1. To speak of the Supreme Being in terms of impious irreverence; to revile or speak reproachfully of God, or the Holy Spirit. Mark 3:28. 2. To speak evil of; to utter abuse or calumny against; to speak reproachfully of. See! That’s what they were doing. They were speaking words of evil about the Holy Spirit. They were speaking evil about His miracles.


So then we read in Mat 12:25 And Jesus knew their thoughts. How did He know their thoughts? The Holy Spirit revealed their thoughts to Him. The Holy Spirit totally ratted them out! And so the first thing the Lord does is brilliantly give an analogy about a kingdom divided against itself. He says in Mat 12:25 And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand: Mat 12:26 And if Satan cast out Satan, he is divided against himself; how shall then his kingdom stand? Why should Satan go against his own policies of evil, tell his demons to do something they don’t want to do, and undermine his own agenda to blind the minds of God’s people with demon possession? The demons wouldn’t put up with such a change in policy. So a kingdom divided against itself would not stand and Satan wasn’t about to tear apart his own kingdom by casting out his own demons. And then in vs. 27, He totally turns the tables on them. He said, Mat 12:27 And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils, by whom do your children cast them out? therefore they shall be your judges. He’s talking about the 12 disciples. This verse explains how the disciples were able to also do miracles. Through the Spirit. He’s saying, how did they somehow become empowered by Satan to do the same miracles as me? They can’t explain it. They weren’t empowered by Satan. They’re using the same Holy Spirit the Lord’s using. And this is why they shall be YOUR judges. This was absolutely brilliant.


And then there was the analogy about the strong man’s house. Mat 12:29 Or else how can one enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he first bind the strong man? and then he will spoil his house. I’ll just quote my buddy, Bryan Ross. “Satan had made himself at home within Israel [and] was holding God’s nations as his lawful captive. Therefore, in order for Christ to reclaim what was rightly His, He first need to bind the strong man and then He would be able to spoil his house. Through the casting out of devils Jesus was in the process of binding the strong man and contending for Israel.”

f. And then the Lord speaks of blaspheming the Holy Spirit. Mat 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. Mat 12:32 And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the worldto come.


Let’s first establish the fact that the Lord is talking to the Pharisees and unbelieving Jews. This issue of blaspheming the Holy Spirit has nothing to do with us today. The Lord is not speaking about us or to us. He’s speaking to the Pharisees in the context of establishing His kingdom here on Earth. Period. This is not our mail.


Second, the Lord clearly defines here what it means to blaspheme the Spirit. He spells it out. He says in vs. 32 that it’s speaking against the Holy Ghost. To be guilty of blaspheming the Holy Spirit was to verbally speak evil about the Spirit. Or to speak evil about the work of the Holy Spirit. As Webster pointed out, it is to speak words of impious irreverence about the Holy Spirit, to speak evil of, or to speak reproachfully of the Holy Spirit. The Pharisees here saying that the Lord doesn’t cast out devils but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils is a perfect example of what it means to blaspheme the Holy Spirit. They were saying that that work of the Holy Spirit was of the devil, which was total blasphemy.


Third, let’s establish again – what does it mean for the kingdom saints to NOT be forgiven by God? Does this mean that if they were saved, they’d lose their salvation? No. Does this mean that it was impossible for them to get saved? No. It simply means that there is an eternal consequence for this behavior. It means that this behavior would go unforgiven. This behavior will affect their placement and their role inside the kingdom for all eternity. What was true of the disciples in Matt. 6 is also true here in Matt. 12. Does this mean that they can still get saved? Emphatically, I say yes! The text bears this out! If they couldn’t get saved what would be the point of the Lord saying that All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? If you couldn’t get saved, then what’s the point of having all your other sins forgiven? Why would Jesus forgive all their other sins if He’s sending them to hell for unbelief? That makes no sense! The text itself bears out the fact that all these men could still get saved, get all their sins forgiven, but if they blaspheme the Spirit, there will be an eternal consequence for that one sin. Period. This one sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit will carry with it an eternal consequence. This will affect their placement and role in the kingdom forever and ever.


Charles F. Baker in his book, “Understanding the Gospels,” one of my favorite grace books, he would write, “Then follows what has been called the unpardonable sin, which has been so misinterpreted as to cause many people deep spiritual harm…” Then Baker would go on to misinterpret and butcher everything that was said about the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit. On some things with Baker, you could say, “He was in the right ballpark.” On this subject, Baker wasn’t even in the right solar system. He wrote, “We believe first that this sin could not be committed until the Holy Spirit was given, and that was after the death and resurrection of Christ.” That’s absolutely ridiculous! The Pharisees had just now blasphemed the Holy Spirit to the Lord’s face by saying He cast out demons by the power of Satan. If they could blaspheme the Spirit here in Matt. 12, they could do it at any other time until Pentecost! Plus, the Lord said, “Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.” He’s not talking about future blasphemy of the Spirit that might happen at Pentecost. He means that from this moment forward, anyone who blasphemes the Spirit shall not be forgiven when HIS judgment takes place in the future. Then Baker would write that it was in the nation “rejecting Christ now [at Pentecost] they were sinning against the Holy Spirit.” That is a complete misinterpretation of everything the Lord said here. The Lord clearly defined what it meant to blaspheme the Spirit. It’s speaking words against the Holy Ghost. It is to verbally speak evil about the Spirit. Or to speak evil about the work of the Holy Spirit. Rejecting Christ at Pentecost had nothing to do with what the Lord defined here as blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. But we’ll get to that.


Let me ask another question. What did the Lord mean when He said in vs. 32, but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come? What is that world to come that He’s talking about? Notice that world is italicized, which means it’s not in the original. But the context bears out the fact that world should be there in English because the clause before it said, neither in this world. So the Lord must also mean neither in the world to come. What IS that world to come? Notice that it’s world, singular. World is often synonymous with age. I’m convinced He’s talking about the Tribulation, because it’s in the Tribulation, Israel’s baptism of fire, in which the Lord will separate the wheat from the chaff and He will judge the Pharisees and all of unbelieving Israel with fire unquenchable and He will especially judge anyone who committed the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit. It’s at the end of the Tribulation, at His Second Coming in which the Lord will judge Israel and give them their roles in the kingdom. So if someone committed blasphemy against the Holy Spirit and later got saved, it’s THEN at His Second Coming when the Lord will judge all His people, it’s THEN that He will remember anyone’s sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, which will be held against them when they’re given their roles in the kingdom. Turn to Mark 3.


Eternal Damnation?


We have the same account but look at the phrasing here. Mar 3:28 Verily I say unto you, All sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme:Mar 3:29 But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation: Mar 3:30Because they said, He hath an unclean spirit. Some might be asking, why is the wording different here from what we read in Matt. 12? The Lord said everything in Matt. 12, and He said everything here in Mark 3. We’re only getting highlights of lengthy messages He gave. So if the Lord spoke for an hour, then He likely repeated the same points in different ways over the course of that same message He gave over the course of an hour. Any good teacher would repeat Himself so those important points would sink in with the hearers. And again, the Lord clearly defines here what it meant to blaspheme the Spirit in vs. 30. “Because they said, He hath an unclean spirit.” It’s speaking words against the Holy Ghost. It is to verbally speak evil about the Spirit. Or to speak evil about the work of the Holy Spirit. And the Lord also says here that they hath “never forgiveness”. Never forgiveness goes back to the points we made about Matt. 6 and Matt. 12. Does never forgiveness mean that they couldn’t get saved? No. This means that if they blaspheme the Holy Spirit, there will be eternal consequences for that. Period. The Lord also makes two points here that reinforces the fact that they could still get saved. He said in vs. 28, “Verily I say unto you, All sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme”. Again, if you couldn’t get saved, then what’s the point of having all their other sins forgiven? Why would He forgive any of them for anything if He’s sending them to hell for unbelief? And then He says in vs. 29 that they would be “in danger of eternal damnation”. Being in danger of eternal damnation does not mean that they would automatically be sent to eternal damnation if they blaspheme the Spirit. They are only in danger of eternal damnation. So why did the Lord say this? I think He’s simply dangling their feet over the flames of hell to instill in them real fear for the great offense of blaspheming the Spirit. Let’s look at Pentecost. Turn to Acts 7.


Acts 7


For the sake of time we’re just going to look at Act 7:51. Nowhere in the book of Acts does it say that anyone blasphemed the Holy Spirit. Nowhere in this account of the stoning of Stephen do we read of anyone speaking evil of the Holy Spirit. Nowhere do we read that anyone said something like, “Stephen is speaking these things, because he hath an unclean spirit.” But Stephen tells them what they are doing in vs. 51. He says, “Ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Ghost: as your fathers did, so do ye.” Resisting the conviction of the Holy Spirit is a completely different concept than speaking words of evil about the Holy Spirit as the Pharisees did with the Lord Jesus Christ. And I know the reaction would be, “Didn’t the people of Israel blaspheme the Spirit when they stoned Stephen who was filled with the Spirit and the Spirit was speaking through Stephen?” That’s not what happened. You remember a few weeks ago, we did the message on “Tongues of Fire.” Remember what the Lord told the disciples about what will happen when the Spirit of truth is come?


Joh 16:13 Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will shew you things to come. Joh 16:14 He shall glorify me: for he shall receive of mine, and shall shew it unto you…

The way that the Spirit operated at Pentecost was that the things the Spirit would hear would be the words He would speak when they were filled with the Spirit. Whose words did the Spirit hear? The Lord said, “He shall glorify me”. The Lord would only speak words to glorify the Father. Thus, I think the Spirit heard the words of the Father, and it was the words of the Father that the Spirit passed on to the disciples and it was the words of the Father that Peter spoke at Pentecost. The same thing happened with Stephen because this was how the Spirit operated at Pentecost. Like everything else in Scripture, in this moment with Stephen, we’re seeing the entire Godhead operating together. These were the words of the Father about the Son conveyed through the Holy Spirit. They stoned Stephen not because they were blaspheming the Spirit by speaking words of evil about the Holy Spirit. They stoned Stephen because of the content of what he said. These were the words of the Father about the Son conveyed through the Holy Spirit. When they stoned Stephen, they weren’t rejecting the Holy Spirit. They were rejecting the entire Godhead. They were rejecting the words of the Father about the Son that was conveyed through the Spirit. If anything, the people of Israel were rejecting the Father, first and foremost. They were rejecting the Son second. And they were rejecting the Spirit, third. This wasn’t about the Holy Spirit. This was about the will of the Father in everything He said about His Son.


Now there has always been in grace this compunction by some to say that what we see in the gospels is the rejection of the Father, the Son, and then the rejection of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, and this is why the Lord was seen by Stephen standing in judgment, because after the entire Godhead had been rejected, then God set Israel aside and implemented this period of grace. That sounds good. I can understand why someone would want to say that. But that doesn’t hold water. Here's a question: When did Israel reject the Father? One pastor I know and love said, “The Father had sent John the Baptist.” How can this be when John was also filled with the Spirit since His inception? John was sent by the Father, filled with the Spirit, to pave the way for the Son. If anyone rejected John, they were rejecting the entire Godhead. Some might say, didn’t they reject the Son when they crucified Him? How can that be when the Lord said, “He that hateth me hateth my Father also” (Joh 15:23). He said “I am come in my Father's name” (Joh 5:43). He said, “I do nothing of myself; but as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things” (Joh 8:28). He said, “I and my Father are one” (Joh 10:30). He said, “I am in the Father, and the Father in me? the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself: but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (Joh 14:10). He said, “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father” (Joh 14:9). When they crucified Christ, they rejected the Father and the works of the Spirit done through the Lord. They were rejecting the entire Godhead. And when we arrive at Pentecost, again, this is not a rejection of the Spirit. This was a rejection of the entire Godhead, because what was said at Pentecost were the words of the Father about the Son conveyed through the Spirit. Everything that took place throughout the Gospel period was a rejection of the entire Godhead.


Which brings us to the subject of Saul. There has been this lingering question about Saul, who it was said in Acts 8:1 that Saul was consenting unto the death of Stephen. And the question has always been, “How could Saul get saved if he participated in the blaspheming of the Spirit when Stephen was stoned?” I’ve heard a pastor say, “Well, Saul was permitted to get saved because he did that ignorantly in unbelief.” That makes no sense! That is total bunk! The answer to the question is that 1) They didn’t blaspheme the Spirit when they stoned Stephen. They only resisted the Spirit, which is incompatible with blaspheming the Spirit, and ultimately, they didn’t reject the Spirit. They rejected the entire Godhead. 2) Even if they blasphemed the Spirit, they could still get saved.


Conclusion


I had a pastor who always told me to end a message with the question, “So what? So what does this mean for me?” I’ll tell you what this means.


This subject about the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit has nothing to do with you. The Lord was speaking to the Pharisees in the context of establishing His kingdom here on Earth. This is not our mail. Second, the Lord clearly defined what it meant to blaspheme the Spirit. It’s speaking words of evil against the Holy Ghost. The Father’s refusal to forgive them for this offense only meant that there would be an eternal consequence in terms of their placement and role in the kingdom. They could still get saved. Also, what happened at Pentecost was not a case of blasphemy the Holy Spirit as the Lord defined it. They were rejecting the entire Godhead, rejecting the words of the Father for what He said about His Son. And finally, in this age of grace, there is no sin, not even the blasphemy of the Spirit, that cannot be washed by the precious blood of the Lord Jesus Christ. What does Paul tell us in Colossians 2:13? God has “forgiven you ALL trespasses.

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