• Joel

Yet Not I, But...


[Below are the notes to Joel's sermon from yesterday. Enjoy!]


Did you know that the Apostle Paul says “Yet not I” on 3 different occasions? He’s the only one in the entire Bible who uses that phrase. Why? What’s the significance of those three little words? I thought it was significant enough for a whole message and we’re going to start here in 1 Cor. 7. Look at vs. 10. He says, 1Co_7:10And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband…” Of course, the point of this verse is pretty straightforward. Don’t leave your spouse. Just as Adam said in Gen. 2:24 that a man shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh, so too, the woman should cleave unto her husband. But the bigger point is to be at peace. If at all possible, as much as lieth within you, be at peace. If your spouse is an unbeliever, if at all possible, be at peace. But it’s interesting that Paul says, I command, but it’s not me, it’s the Lord. Paul may have been writing this commandment, but he was sharing the words of the Lord Himself. The Lord commanded Paul to command us and Paul would later say in 1Co_14:37 that the things that I write unto you are the commandments of the Lord. This wasn’t normal inspiration of Scripture by the Spirit, which is usually referred to as Non-Verbal, Plenary Inspiration in which the Holy Spirit moved the writer to pen the thoughts of God in his own words. This verse falls under the idea of Mechanical Inspiration. Which is dictation. “Thus saith the Lord Himself.” His words to us.


Identified with Christ


This next verse is so obscure we won’t even turn there. You’ve probably never heard it before. A little verse found in Galatians 2:20, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.” I know a lot of people love this verse for many different reasons, primarily that we have such a mighty declaration of the life of Christ in us. The good things we do for the Lord, we cannot do any of them on our own. It’s Christ in you, Christ’s life manifesting itself in you, living out in you, once you allow His words to dwell in you richly and bear fruit. So any good thing we accomplish is always to His praise and never our own, because it is always “Not I, but Christ.”


But I love this verse, because it’s pure identification, which is my all-time favorite doctrine. Paul doesn’t say here that because I believed in Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection as an all-sufficient substitutionary atonement for all my sins, then God the Father gave me that free gift of eternal life. He’s not saying that. He’s saying that the moment he believed in Christ and what He accomplished for Him at Calvary that he became spiritually identified with Christ such that he can now say, as we all can say, I am crucified with Christ! We’re so identified with Him and His work at Calvary that His death became our victory!


Turn to Rom. 6. “What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. (Romans 6:1-4)


Paul here is addressing the question, which has been leveled against us since the dawn of the age of grace, if you’re preaching Once Saved Always Saved, then aren’t you given people a license to sin? How does Paul answer this? He says, What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? God forbid! God Himself would forbid such a heinous thought! Why would God crucify His Son to give us a license to sin? He expands his answer with 3 points:

  • Vs 2. “How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?

  • Why should we live in sin when we have died to sin?

  • 3-4. “Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.”

  • Through the baptism of the Spirit, we have been gloriously identified with Christ in His death, burial, and resurrection.

  • Vs 6. “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him...

  • Our old man, our old self, is crucified with Christ.


I know that many in Christendom today when they see these verses in Romans 6:3-4, they immediately assume “water” and they think of the baptism of John. I say just consider the baptism of the Spirit here, because Paul doesn’t say that, through a watery witness we’re buried like Christ was buried. He says in Romans 6:3 that “we are buried with him by baptism into death.” Rom. 6:3-4 doesn’t tell us that we are buried like Christ through water but that we are buried with Christ through the Spirit. There is a mighty distinction between a watery witness and us spiritually participating in His death being buried with Christ. Paul in these verses is going to the very core of our spiritual transformation the moment we believed.


He’s saying that we’re so thoroughly identified with Christ the moment we believe through the baptism of the Spirit that His crucifixion became our spiritual reality. God allowed us to be transformed spiritually as Christ was transformed literally. The moment we believed, we were identified with Christ in that our souls were united with Christ in His work on the cross. His sacrifice became our sacrifice. His burial became our burial. His resurrection became our resurrection. The newness of His life after His resurrection became our “newness of life.” As a result of our spiritual death, burial, and resurrection with Christ through the one baptism of the Holy Spirit, we are now and forever victorious over sin and death as much as Christ Himself is forever victorious. God loved us so much as to make us so intimately identified with His Son that when we place our faith in the Lord Jesus Christ as our Savior, we spiritually die with Him, which means that our old man, which is our old selves, is crucified with Him on that cross. Then, we are spiritually buried with Him. Everything we were in Adam and all our sins are buried with Him. And finally, we are spiritually risen from the grave with Him, “like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father.” We are made victorious with Him in our spiritual resurrection freed from the bondage of sin and death just as Christ Himself was freed after He rose from the grave, and we are now living His resurrected life, a permanent newness of life.


When we get saved, what is it exactly that we believed? We believed in who Christ was and that He died on that cross, was buried, and rose again the third day as a complete payment for all our sins. And then in Romans 6, God says to reckon that truth for yourself. See yourself as dead, buried, and risen with Christ.


Are we dead with Christ? Gal. 2:20 says, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live…” Are we buried with Christ? Rom. 6:4 says that we are “buried with him by baptism…” And are we risen with Christ? Col. 2:12 tells us “…ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.” We are dead, buried, and risen with Christ living in His newness of life right now! The same tenets you accept by faith to become saved are the same tenets you accept by faith to reckon everything you are in Christ. Because if you consider the all-sufficiency of what Christ accomplished on the cross, how can we not become identified with His death, burial, and resurrection? Because the very point of Christ dying on that cross is for you to have victory over sin and death! You have to become dead, buried, and resurrected with Christ in order for His victory to become a reality in your life the moment you believed! It’s as if God the Father is saying, now that you’ve reckoned that my Son died, was buried, and resurrected for you, now go reckon that truth for yourself as being dead, buried, and resurrected with My Son. Identification goes hand-in-hand with the gospel because in order for you to become a new creature alive unto God freed from the bondage and condemnation of sin, you to have become dead, buried, and resurrected with Christ. The fact that identification goes hand-in-hand with the gospel is illustrated by the fact that Paul challenges you at the beginning of Romans 6 and says repeatedly, “know ye not?” He’s saying, basically, “don’t you realize the magnitude of what Christ accomplished for you, in you, and through you? In order for His eternal life to become a reality the moment you believe, by logical necessity, you must be dead, buried, and resurrected with Christ!” When we place our faith in Him, we are forever identified with His work on the cross, spiritually transformed as Christ was literally transformed, and we’re made to be risen with Him by the same power found within the glory of God the Father, which raised Christ from the dead. We enter a new state. We became new creatures (2 Cor. 5:17; Gal. 6:15) with God’s righteousness imputed to us (Rom. 4:23-25). We’re made alive unto God (Rom. 6:11), complete in Him (Col. 2:10), accepted in the beloved (Eph. 1:3), blessed with all spiritual blessings (Eph. 1:3), sealed by the Spirit (Eph. 1:13), seated in the Heavenlies (Eph. 2:6), forgiven all trespasses (Col. 2:13), circumcised with the circumcision made without hands (Col. 2:11), baptized into the Body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:13), one with Christ (Eph. 5:30), freed from the curse of the law (Gal. 3:13), heirs of God and joint-heirs with Christ (Rom. 8:17), washed, regenerated, and renewed by the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5), and we’re now living His resurrection life until our bodies are redeemed (Eph. 2:4-6). It’s because of all these aspects of our transformation that Pastor Jordan would say of 1 Cor. 15:10, “It was the grace of God that was Paul's strength--and so it is with us. When we are allured or opposed by the world, the flesh and\or the devil, like Paul, let’s be strong in the Lord, by faith taking our stand in what Scripture declares to be the present reality of our identity in Christ. This is where our strength lies. We should live commensurate with the way God sees us in Christ. That is why Paul says, ‘Be strong in the Lord.’ Be strong in the identity God has given us in Christ Jesus.


1 Corinthians 15:10


So let’s read 1 Cor. 15:10, the third, “Yet not I” reference here in 1Co_15:10But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.” This is an amazing verse. Notice that Paul highlights three different aspects about His grace: the grace that transformed him, the grace that was upon him, and the grace that was with him.


He first says, “by the grace of God I am what I am…” This is the grace that transformed him, the grace that made him alive unto God as a new creature able to serve the Lord. It is God's prerogative to say, I am that I am, and yet, it is our privilege that we can say, “by the grace of God I am what I am.” We are nothing but what God makes us, and by faith, we are rich in everything because of His grace to us. Paul wasn’t bragging that HE excelled in his labors because of His grace. Paul was bragging His grace was what made him able to labor for the Lord and in everything he did, he was always indebted to His grace for the results.


So why did Paul say by the grace of God I am what I am? What was it that God made him in Christ that would make Paul say such a thing? This can only come from our identification with Christ’s work at Calvary. In that moment of salvation, we are joined in an eternal union to Christ in Heaven and the all-sufficiency of His work on the cross. Christ’s life becomes our life. Christ’s victory becomes our victory. Christ’s riches become our riches. Christ’s glory becomes our glory. When we place our faith in Him, we are brought into the very perfection of Christ. We are brought into the perfection of His work on the cross. We are brought into the perfection of His victory. When we place our faith in Him, we are forever identified with His work on the cross, spiritually transformed as Christ was literally transformed, and we’re made to be risen with Him by the same power found within the glory of God the Father, which raised Christ from the dead. But, see, there’s more to 1 Cor. 15:10 than just identification.


Grace upon Paul


Paul also speaks of the grace that was bestowed upon him, the grace that was upon him. Isn’t that amazing? I’m reminded of what was said of the apostles at Pentecost. Flip over to Act 4:33And with great power gave the apostles witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus: and great grace was upon them all.” Notice that it wasn’t just grace that was upon them but great grace was upon them. Christ who knew no sin simply had the grace of God upon him, but these great sinners who were willing to courageously serve the Lord before an unbelieving people needed great grace to achieve great things on that great day of Pentecost. So what did this mean, exactly, that great grace was upon the twelve disciples? In the same sense as grace was upon the Lord. They were given unmerited favors of God in the spiritual and physical sense. In the spiritual sense, they had supernatural spiritual gifts, like being able to speak in tongues or the gift of knowledge like we saw with Peter and Ananias and Sapphira in Acts 5. They were also recipients of God’s favors in the physical sense such as when the angel released Peter from prison. And so coming back to 1 Cor. 15, we have Paul, in the early part of his ministry saying of himself that God’s grace was bestowed upon him. I’d suggest that Paul means this in the same sense as what was said of the twelve disciples. I think of Gal 2:8,For he that wrought effectually in Peter to the apostleship of the circumcision, the same was mighty in me toward the Gentiles.” Paul was given supernatural spiritual gifts, like healing, and God helped Paul in a physical sense, such as when he was stoned outside of Lystra. God brought him back to life and he was able to march right back into the town that killed him and continue preaching to the people. One can’t really suggest that this was merely an apostolic exception either. Many saints received supernatural gifts in the early part of Paul’s ministry. But can it be said of us that God’s grace is upon us? Absolutely. But in a different sense. Before God created the world, He looked down the corridor of time, and He thought of each one of us in this period of grace, and He determined not who would be saved but how we would be saved and what our standing before Him would be, holy, elect, and deeply beloved, as beloved as His Son. He also determined to shower us with His grace, all spiritual blessings in this life, working in us through His Word and His Spirit, and we’re recipients of His grace in the life to come being co-inheritors with Christ, inheriting all things in Heaven and Earth. God the Father could not do more for us and He would not do less. His grace is upon us all being given the gift of eternal life, being blessed with all spiritual blessings, being seated in Heavenly places, and in the life to come, being co-inheritors reigning with Christ.


Not I, But Grace


But then Paul says something most interesting. He says, “but I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.” Notice he doesn’t say the grace of God that was IN ME, but he connects his labor to the “grace of God which was with me.” He also speaks of grace with him in the past tense because it was with him when he labored abundantly. So what does it mean His grace was with him when he labored? How does that work exactly – this grace that was with him? Now we can certainly say that His grace is with us wherever we go. Just as we cannot undo what God has made us in Christ, so too, His grace never fails us nor leaves us. His grace is always why we are able to do any good thing we do for the Lord, because His grace is what transformed us to be alive unto God to do His good pleasure. We also know that His grace is our influence, our inspiration, our motivation, the fuel to our engines, when we serve the Lord. The result of His grace is an attitude of gratitude in us as we serve Him. Because of His grace, we can and should give the Lord praise for every good thing we accomplish. This verse isn’t simply about the life of Christ living in us but about us working alongside that specific aspect of His nature that reigns today, His grace. He says, “I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.” This wasn’t about Paul. This was about God’s grace. Paul was always indebted to, and attributed any success he had in his labors to, God’s grace that was with him. All that is good in us, all that is good that flows out of us comes from that same holy stream of divine grace. Notice that Paul makes the connection between his labor and the grace that was with him, which has to mean that Paul was always working alongside of, working in conjunction with, operating hand-in-hand with, His grace when he labored. God doesn’t turn us into robots. We must put effort into our own spiritual lives so that we may operate alongside His grace, which is always with us. True service for God today is living in a way that is in perfect synergy with His grace. Success in our walk is the result of our mind working in synergy with the sound doctrines of grace, and the result is that we’d be conformed to the image of His Son in our walk. This spiritual synergy is us living in perfect alignment with how His grace operates today, us living in perfect agreement with what His grace has made us in His Son and how His grace motivates us. This must also mean that if we can labor alongside His grace, then it must also be possible for believers to live and to labor in a way that works against His grace. How does that happen?


Working Against His Grace


First, you cannot help but work against His grace if you don’t even know how His grace operates. You are working against His grace if you don’t even know what His sound doctrines of grace are. You are working against His grace if you’re living in the flesh because His grace freed you from the dominion of sin. You are working against His grace if you fall into the trap of legalism like the Galatians. Falling from His grace in that sense is the same as working against His grace, because grace is diametrically opposed to legalism. You are working against His grace if you believe that we’re under some works-based acceptance system where we have to do things to earn God’s approval to get into Heaven when Paul makes it abundantly clear that our salvation is not based upon His acceptance of what we have done for Him but rather our acceptance of what Christ has done for us on the cross of Calvary. As J.C. O’Hair would say, “We’re not saved by how we live! We live by how we are saved!” So you are working against His grace if you think you have to do things, like asceticism, in order to achieve what God has already achieved for you when He identified you with His Son through the baptism of the Spirit.


But there is effort needed on our part in order to work alongside His grace, and that is to renew your mind, to study the Word rightly divided, which is to extract from Paul’s letters God’s will for us today. So if you do not study, if you do not meditate upon His Word, and if you do not pray, then you are not working with His grace because you’re not growing spiritually in His grace. You will not appropriate the exceeding greatness of His power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of His mighty power, if the eyes of your understanding are never enlightened, if you do not know what is the hope of His calling, and what is the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints. You will not be able to put on the new man, and you will remain stuck in the dead patterns and defeated thinking of the flesh. You will not experience the empowerment of the Spirit, what it means to be strengthened with